Folia lib.
“Wenn der Presse-Mob Kollegen zusammentritt…”
Monday 28 July 2014 @ 2:31 pm

Liebe Freunde des zelebrierten Kettentastaturmassakers,

    “Wenn der Presse-Mob Kollegen zusammentritt…”

sind die Damen und Herren Kollegen mit Kollegen tendenziös beschäftigt, was not-amused Raungästen

    “Einblicke in den total versauten Berufsstand der Journalisten”

verschafft:

Das Aquarium des Journalismus ist eine Parallelwelt; seine Scheiben sind stumpf, seine Schreiben sind Sumpf…

Grüße aus der realen Welt.

PS: “Der Daten-Mob in den Straßen”
http://ariplex.com/folia/archives/682.htm




Dass Politiker Psychopathen sind, wissen wir doch!
Saturday 26 July 2014 @ 7:31 am

Dass Politiker Psychopathen sind, wissen wir doch!

Aber sie setzen alles daran, es täglich neu zu beweisen:

1x URL
1x Zitat
1x Kritik

Darf ich noch nach Spanien einreisen?

Comments (0) - Posted in Optix by  



Die NSA ist ein Segen.
Wednesday 23 July 2014 @ 3:33 am

Die NSA ist ein Segen.

Viele Menschen erleben zum ersten Mal, daß ihnen jemand wirklich richtig zuhört.




Are they brain-dead at ProPublica?
Monday 21 July 2014 @ 3:42 pm

Today Bruce Schneier wrote a shocking post in his blog, in plain and clear words:

    https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2014/07/fingerprinting_.html
    (highlighting by me)
    [*quote*]
    ————————————————–
    Schneier on Security

    Fingerprinting Computers By Making Them Draw Images

    Here’s a new way
    (https://securehomes.esat.kuleuven.be/~gacar/persistent/index.html)
    to identify individual computers over the Internet. The page instructs the browser to draw an image. Because each computer draws the image slightly differently, this can be used to uniquely identify each computer. This is a big deal, because there’s no way to block this right now.

    Article:

    http://www.propublica.org/article/meet-the-online-tracking-device-that-is-virtually-impossible-to-block

    Posted on July 21, 2014 at 3:34 PM
    ————————————————–
    [*/quote*]

.
That’s it. Plain and simple. Now let us look at the text at ProPublica:
.

    http://www.propublica.org/article/meet-the-online-tracking-device-that-is-virtually-impossible-to-block
    (highlighting by me)
    [*quote*]
    ————————————————–
    Meet the Online Tracking Device That is Virtually Impossible to Block

    A new kind of tracking tool, canvas fingerprinting, is being used to follow visitors to thousands of top websites, from WhiteHouse.gov to YouPorn.

    by Julia Angwin
    ProPublica, July 21, 2014, 9 a.m.

    This is part of an ongoing investigation:
    Surveillance

    ProPublica investigates the threats to privacy in an era of cellphones, data mining and cyberwar.

    Connect with Facebook to share articles you read on ProPublica. Learn more »
    Safeguard the public interest.

    Support ProPublica’s award-winning investigative journalism.

    Donate
    Latest Stories in this Project

    Here’s One Way to Land on the NSA’s Watch List
    Privacy Tools: How to Block Online Tracking
    Podcast: Mapping the NSA’s Spying
    FAQ For Our NSA Chart
    No Warrant, No Problem: How the Government Can Get Your Digital Data

    Meet the Online Tracking Device That is Virtually Impossible to Block
    California Halts Injection of Fracking Waste, Warning it May Be Contaminating Aquifers
    Privacy Tools: How to Block Online Tracking
    Error: You Have No Payments from Pharma
    Podcast: Glaser, Cuomo, and the Refusals That Made the Story
    Why Online Tracking Is Getting Creepier
    Who Advised Cuomo on Mortgage Industry Investigation? A Mortgage Lobbyist
    It’s Complicated: Facebook’s History of Tracking You
    We’re Still Not Tracking Patient Harm
    Dollars for Docs

    (David Sleight/ProPublica)

    Update: A YouPorn.com spokesperson said that the website was “completely unaware that AddThis contained a tracking software that had the potential to jeopardize the privacy of our users.” After this article was published, YouPorn removed AddThis technology from its website.

    This story was co-published with Mashable.

    A new, extremely persistent type of online tracking is shadowing visitors to thousands of top websites, from WhiteHouse.gov to YouPorn.com.

    First documented in a forthcoming paper by researchers at Princeton University and KU Leuven University in Belgium, this type of tracking, called canvas fingerprinting, works by instructing the visitor’s Web browser to draw a hidden image. Because each computer draws the image slightly differently, the images can be used to assign each user’s device a number that uniquely identifies it.
    Canvas Fingerprinting in Action

    Watch your browser generate a unique fingerprint image. This is for informational purposes only and no fingerprint information is sent to ProPublica. (Mike Tigas, ProPublica)
    See your browser’s fingerprint

    Click the button above and your computer and web browser will draw a ProPublica-designed canvas fingerprint.

    Like other tracking tools, canvas fingerprints are used to build profiles of users based on the websites they visit — profiles that shape which ads, news articles, or other types of content are displayed to them.

    But fingerprints are unusually hard to block: They can’t be prevented by using standard Web browser privacy settings or using anti-tracking tools such as AdBlock Plus.

    The researchers found canvas fingerprinting computer code, primarily written by a company called AddThis, on 5 percent of the top 100,000 websites. Most of the code was on websites that use AddThis’ social media sharing tools. Other fingerprinters include the German digital marketer Ligatus and the Canadian dating site Plentyoffish. (A list of all the websites on which researchers found the code is here
    https://securehomes.esat.kuleuven.be/~gacar/sticky/index.html).

    Rich Harris, chief executive of AddThis, said that the company began testing canvas fingerprinting earlier this year as a possible way to replace “cookies,” the traditional way that users are tracked, via text files installed on their computers.

    “We’re looking for a cookie alternative,” Harris said in an interview.

    Harris said the company considered the privacy implications of canvas fingerprinting before launching the test, but decided “this is well within the rules and regulations and laws and policies that we have.”

    He added that the company has only used the data collected from canvas fingerprints for internal research and development. The company won’t use the data for ad targeting or personalization if users install the AddThis opt-out cookie on their computers, he said.

    Arvind Narayanan, the computer science professor who led the Princeton research team, countered that forcing users to take AddThis at its word about how their data will be used, is “not the best privacy assurance.”

    Device fingerprints rely on the fact that every computer is slightly different: Each contains different fonts, different software, different clock settings and other distinctive features. Computers automatically broadcast some of their attributes when they connect to another computer over the Internet.

    Tracking companies have long sought to use those differences to uniquely identify devices for online advertising purposes, particularly as Web users are increasingly using ad-blocking software and deleting cookies.

    In May 2012, researchers at the University of California, San Diego, noticed that a Web programming feature called “canvas” could allow for a new type of fingerprint — by pulling in different attributes than a typical device fingerprint.
    How You Can Try to Thwart Canvas Fingerprinting

    Use the Tor browser (Warning: can be slow)
    Block JavaScript from loading in your browser (Warning: breaks a lot of web sites)
    Use NoScript browser extension to block JavaScript from known fingerprinters such as AddThis (Warning: requires a lot of research and decision-making)
    Try the experimental browser extension Chameleon that is designed to block fingerprinting (Warning: only recommended for tech-savvy users at this point)
    Install opt-out cookies from known fingerprinters such as AddThis (Warning: fingerprint will likely still be collected, companies simply pledge not to use the data for ad targeting or personalization)

    In June, the Tor Project added a feature to its privacy-protecting Web browser to notify users when a website attempts to use the canvas feature and sends a blank canvas image. But other Web browsers did not add notifications for canvas fingerprinting.

    A year later, Russian programmer Valentin Vasilyev noticed the study and added a canvas feature to freely available fingerprint code that he had posted on the Internet. The code was immediately popular.

    But Vasilyev said that the company he was working for at the time decided against using the fingerprint technology. “We collected several million fingerprints but we decided against using them because accuracy was 90 percent,” he said, “and many of our customers were on mobile and the fingerprinting doesn’t work well on mobile.”

    Vasilyev added that he wasn’t worried about the privacy concerns of fingerprinting. “The fingerprint itself is a number which in no way is related to a personality,” he said.

    AddThis improved upon Vasilyev’s code by adding new tests and using the canvas to draw a pangram “Cwm fjordbank glyphs vext quiz” — a sentence that uses every letter of the alphabet at least once. This allows the company to capture slight variations in how each letter is displayed.

    AddThis said it rolled out the feature to a small portion of the 13 million websites on which its technology appears, but is considering ending its test soon. “It’s not uniquely identifying enough,” Harris said.

    AddThis did not notify the websites on which the code was placed because “we conduct R&D projects in live environments to get the best results from testing,” according to a spokeswoman.

    She added that the company does not use any of the data it collects — whether from canvas fingerprints or traditional cookie-based tracking — from government websites including WhiteHouse.gov for ad targeting or personalization.

    The company offered no such assurances about data it routinely collects from visitors to other sites, such as YouPorn.com. YouPorn.com did not respond to inquiries from ProPublica about whether it was aware of AddThis’ test of canvas fingerprinting on its website.

    Read our recent coverage about how online tracking is getting creepier, how Facebook has been tracking you, and what tools to use to protect yourself.
    Like this story? Sign up for our daily newsletter to get more of our best work.
    Julia Angwin

    Julia Angwin is a senior reporter at ProPublica. From 2000 to 2013, she was a reporter at The Wall Street Journal, where she led a privacy investigative team that was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize in Explanatory Reporting in 2011 and won a Gerald Loeb Award in 2010.
    ————————————————–
    [*/quote*]

.
Tracking is evil. Okay, we know.

Now we look at the policies of ProPublica.

    http://www.propublica.org/about/steal-our-stories
    (highlighting by me)
    [*quote*]
    ————————————————–
    Steal Our Stories

    Unless otherwise noted, you can republish our articles and graphics for free. Here’s what you need to know:

    You can’t edit our material, except to reflect relative changes in time, location and editorial style. (For example, “yesterday” can be changed to “last week,” and “Portland, Ore.” to “Portland” or “here.”)
    If you’re republishing online, you have to link to us and to include all of the links from our story, as well as our PixelPing tag.
    You can’t sell our material separately.
    It’s okay to put our stories on pages with ads, but not ads specifically sold against our stories. You can’t state or imply that donations to your organization support ProPublica’s work.
    You can’t republish our material wholesale, or automatically; you need to select stories to be republished individually. You can’t use our work to populate a web site designed to improve rankings on search engines, or solely to gain revenue from network-based advertisements.
    You cannot republish our photographs or illustrations without specific permission (ask our Communications Director Nicole Collins Bronzan if you’d like to).
    Any web site our stories appear on must include a prominent and effective way to contact you.
    You have to credit us — ideally in the byline. We prefer “Author Name, ProPublica.”
    We do not generally permit translation of our stories into another language.

    Note that you can grab HTML code for our stories easily. Click on the “republish” button “Republish” on the left sidebar of every story.

    We’re licensed under Creative Commons, which provides the legal details. If you have questions, contact our president, Richard Tofel.
    ————————————————–
    [*/quote*]

“We’re licensed under Creative Commons”. Oh, really? How about the “PixelPing tag”? Let’s see:

    http://www.propublica.org/about/pixelping
    (highlighting by me)
    [*quote*]
    ————————————————–
    PixelPing
    What is it?

    ProPublica’s PixelPing is a small snippet of javascript code that we’re asking all of our partners to paste into stories we publish together to let us know how well our story is doing.

    Why are you doing this?

    Our mission is to effect real change through investigative journalism. One of the ways we do this is by providing world-class reporting free of charge to news outlets with large, influential audiences.

    An important piece of information we need in return is a sense of the size of the audience our stories reach on our partners’ web sites. PixelPing is simply an efficient way of getting basic page-view statistics quickly.

    How does it work?

    PixelPing functions much like Google Analytics, Tacoda, Quantcast, and other beacons—only much more simply. All you have to do is copy and paste the following line of code anywhere in the body of the article we’re co-publishing in your website’s content management system—if possible, somewhere close to the top of the story.

    <script type=”text/javascript” src=”http://pixel.propublica.org/pixel.js” async=”true”></script>

    What will my users see?

    Nothing. This will not affect your web page layout at all.
    What does it track?

    Quite simply, it only counts the number of page views to the story on which the code appears. It doesn’t count unique visitors. It also doesn’t count anything on pages other than the one on which you loaded it.

    Who will see the data?

    We will hold the page view data PixelPing collects as confidential, and we will not share it with outsiders, period.

    Does this violate my privacy policy?

    We’re keenly aware of how seriously all of our partners take the privacy of their users. PixelPing does not attempt to track anything at all about visitors—neither individually nor in the aggregate—nor does it attempt to set or read any cookies.

    Will it slow down my page or break my web pages?

    No. We’ve tested our code extensively. Our code is designed to deal with heavy loads, and it’s designed to “fail gracefully,” meaning that even if our servers are overloaded or down, your web page will not be “blocked,” or prevented from loading . The javascript code on your page will always take precedence over PixelPing.

    Who can I contact with questions about it?

    Call Scott Klein, our Editor of News Applications at 917-512-0205 or e-mail him at scott.klein@propublica.org.
    ————————————————–
    [*/quote*]

Tracking is spying, and spying is evil.

We do know that.

But that is not all. The plain text of the ProPublica article is about 9093 Bytes in size. But, no, that is NOT what your download onto your computer to read that web-page. This is a list of what is stored when the browser accesses that very web-page

http://www.propublica.org/article/meet-the-online-tracking-device-that-is-virtually-impossible-to-block

Files list:

    [*quote*]
    --------------------------------------------------
    10848 140717_ap_frack_water_TX_300x200-220x147.jpg
    14164 140717_gt_patient_illo_300x200-220x147.jpg
    77537 20140720-canvas-tracking-630x420.jpg
    8547 20140720-drug-payment-errors-300x200-220x147.jpg
    1575 ads
    1514 ads_002
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    332 ads_004
    1133 ads_005
    330 ads_006
    168376 all_002.js
    240121 all.js
    336 alternatives
    24490 analytics.js
    529 article_pages.js
    1714 beacons.js
    216776 behemoth.css
    2304 btn.js
    1253 button3.js
    1960 cc-logo-30x30gray.png
    18106 chartbeat.js
    12151 client.js
    239 count-data.js
    98228 d.css
    252 downArrow.png
    44128 embed.js
    3024 fb_anon_50x50.png
    266995 fonts_002.css
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    16520 get
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    1589 icn-footer-commons.png
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    604 icon-fb-top-nav_002.png
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    3711 in.js
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    28063 lightgl.js
    21211 loader.js
    309044 margarita.css
    25376 muckreads-briefing-300_5-220x147.png
    163769 nonSecureAnonymousFramework
    44139 osd.js
    40588 outbrain.js
    1454 pocket-logo-30x30-gray.png
    9378 ppfp2.js
    24731 print-2011.css
    89642 pubads_impl_44.js
    4188 ss-social.js
    11773 ss-standard.js
    780 telephoneline.html
    667 typekit.js
    99152 widgets.js
    260771 woland.css

    a_data:
    total 904
    3100 avatar92_002.jpg
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    1941 avatar92_007.jpg
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    3392 avatar92.jpg
    262371 common.js
    2050 config.js
    30481 discovery.css
    67737 discovery.js
    39 event_002.js
    40 event_003.js
    40 event.js
    40219 ga.js
    247634 lounge_002.js
    151961 lounge.css
    20112 lounge.js
    1083 noavatar92_002.png
    1644 noavatar92.png

    a_data:
    total 904
    3100 avatar92_002.jpg
    2386 avatar92_003.jpg
    5356 avatar92_004.jpg
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    262371 common.js
    2050 config.js
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    1083 noavatar92_002.png
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    button3_data:
    total 272
    2541 blog_snoo.png
    13130 button.js
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    153768 reddit.css

    button3_data:
    total 272
    2541 blog_snoo.png
    13130 button.js
    91342 jquery.js
    153768 reddit.css

    button_data:
    total 12
    3045 button.css
    2309 button.js
    1262 shared.js

    button_data:
    total 12
    3045 button.css
    2309 button.js
    1262 shared.js

    comScore_data:
    total 4
    1900 beacon.js

    comScore_data:
    total 4
    1900 beacon.js

    follow_button_data:
    total 4
    235 info.js

    follow_button_data:
    total 4
    235 info.js

    like_box_data:
    total 320
    1632 1017427_10203469917295163_236486091_n.jpg
    45711 10409080_10152590133149445_4917190480511645048_n.png
    1781 10462526_10152200185590893_7053101618144386478_n.jpg
    11163 10476274_10152590336794445_4839032174365312900_n.jpg
    1035 10501749_10152531274399445_2641136824263975971_n.jpg
    1274 1173778_10201114396436529_500688041_n.jpg
    1278 1922174_1386034441669544_1502972313_n.jpg
    1548 262386_113398238864171_404739224_n.jpg
    1567 300049_2415469462690_970759569_n.jpg
    1432 35009_4709402008728_176015776_n.jpg
    1658 394084_2536124019943_257728864_n.jpg
    1407 470_10151385422193542_1237461544_n.jpg
    1700 576259_429920833702654_50965550_n.jpg
    522 GsNJNwuI-UM.gif
    11919 safe_image.jpeg
    196732 sh9-faBNTLB.js

    like_box_data:
    total 320
    1632 1017427_10203469917295163_236486091_n.jpg
    45711 10409080_10152590133149445_4917190480511645048_n.png
    1781 10462526_10152200185590893_7053101618144386478_n.jpg
    11163 10476274_10152590336794445_4839032174365312900_n.jpg
    1035 10501749_10152531274399445_2641136824263975971_n.jpg
    1274 1173778_10201114396436529_500688041_n.jpg
    1278 1922174_1386034441669544_1502972313_n.jpg
    1548 262386_113398238864171_404739224_n.jpg
    1567 300049_2415469462690_970759569_n.jpg
    1432 35009_4709402008728_176015776_n.jpg
    1658 394084_2536124019943_257728864_n.jpg
    1407 470_10151385422193542_1237461544_n.jpg
    1700 576259_429920833702654_50965550_n.jpg
    522 GsNJNwuI-UM.gif
    11919 safe_image.jpeg
    196732 sh9-faBNTLB.js

    login_button_data:
    total 380
    374060 e1Gxr4mnnN5.js
    1056 iqVGY7gYXlg.gif
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    tweet_button_data:
    total 4
    156 count.js
    --------------------------------------------------
    [*/quote*]

In total: 8 directories, 123 files, 5 MegaBytes.

The plain article text is mere 9093 Bytes. The web-page one must load, is 560 times as large.

9093 Bytes, that is about 4 pages of text on typewriter paper sized A4. 5 MegaBytes is roughly 2240 pages. ProPublica bloats the web-pages, jams the lines, pours Javashit junk into their readers’ computers.

Is that journalism?

I say: NO!

And, not to forget the PixelPing tag: to track the readers.

The NSA is attacked because of spying. But that is their job.

The media (see the article!) commit INTENSIVE spying on all of us.

That is not their job.

It is a crime.




4 neue Meilensteine der medizinischen Forschung
Sunday 13 July 2014 @ 5:20 pm

Daß innerhalb so kurzer Zeit 4 Meilensteine entdeckt werden, dürfte nicht allzu häufig vorkommen, nehme ich an.

Meilenstein 1: die Steuerungsregion des Bewußtseins räumlich lokalisiert

    [*quote*]
    ———————————————————
    Consciousness on-off switch discovered deep in brain
    02 July 2014 by Helen Thomson
    Magazine issue 2976

    ONE moment you’re conscious, the next you’re not. For the first time,
    researchers have switched off consciousness by electrically stimulating a
    single brain area.

    Scientists have been probing individual regions of the brain for over a
    century, exploring their function by zapping them with electricity and
    temporarily putting them out of action. Despite this, they have never been
    able to turn off consciousness – until now.
    ———————————————————
    [*/quote*]

    mehr:
    http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22329762.700-consciousness-onoff-switch-discovered-deep-in-brain.html

#

Meilenstein 2: Hirnverletzungen erhöhen die Wahrscheinlichkeit für Demenz

Die bisherigen Forschungen haben gezeigt, daß Kopfstöße beim Fußball Schäden hervorrufen. Wie ist es dann erst zu verantworten, daß GEZIELT in Schulen Boxen “unterrichtet” wird?

    [*quote*]
    ———————————————————
    Traumatic brain injury and risk of dementia in older veterans

    Deborah E. Barnes, PhD, MPH,
    Allison Kaup, PhD,
    Katharine A. Kirby, MA,
    Amy L. Byers, PhD, MPH,
    Ramon Diaz-Arrastia, MD, PhD and
    Kristine Yaffe, MD

    Published online before print June 25, 2014,
    doi:
    10.1212/WNL.0000000000000616 Neurology 10.1212/WNL.0000000000000616

    Abstract

    Objectives: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in military personnel,
    and there is growing concern about the long-term effects of TBI on the
    brain; however, few studies have examined the association between TBI and
    risk of dementia in veterans.

    Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 188,764 US veterans
    aged 55 years or older who had at least one inpatient or outpatient visit
    during both the baseline (2000–2003) and follow-up (2003–2012) periods and
    did not have a dementia diagnosis at baseline. TBI and dementia diagnoses
    were determined using ICD-9 codes in electronic medical records. Fine-Gray
    proportional hazards models were used to determine whether TBI was
    associated with greater risk of incident dementia, accounting for the
    competing risk of death and adjusting for demographics, medical
    comorbidities, and psychiatric disorders.
    ———————————————————
    [*/quote*]

    mehr:
    http://www.neurology.org/content/early/2014/06/20/WNL.0000000000000616

#

Meilenstein 3: Neugeborene bei Sauerstoffmangel, zum Beispiel durch Geburtskomplikationen, zu unterkühlen, erhöht die Überlebenswahrscheinlichkeit und verbessert langfristig die Wahrscheinlichkeit einer normalen Hirnleistung

    [*quote*]
    ———————————————————
    Cooling protects oxygen-deprived infants

    Use of hypothermia in babies at risk of brain damage lessens risk of long-term disability.

    Erika Check Hayden

    09 July 2014

    Nearly 750,000 babies born each year in the United Kingdom are at risk of
    brain damage because of low oxygen during birth.

    Cooling babies who are at risk of brain damage provides long-lasting
    prevention of such injuries, researchers report today in the New England
    Journal of Medicine1.

    A team led by Denis Azzopardi, a neonatologist at King’s College London,
    lowered the body temperature of 145 full-term babies who were born after
    at least 36 weeks of gestation. All were at risk of brain damage because
    they had been deprived of oxygen during birth.

    The researchers cooled the infants to between 33°C and 34°C for 72 hours,
    starting within 6 hours of birth. The technique is known to boost the
    chances that children avoid brain damage until they become toddlers2, but
    any longer-term benefits have remained unclear.

    The study finds treated babies had better mental and physical health than
    untreated infants through to ages 6 or 7: they were 60% more likely to
    have normal intelligence, hearing and vision. Those who survived to
    childhood also had fewer disabilities such as difficulty walking and
    seeing.

    “The bottom line is that this doubles a child’s chance of normal
    survival,” says David Edwards, a neonatologist at King’s College London
    and an author of the study.
    ———————————————————
    [*/quote*]

    mehr:
    http://www.nature.com/news/cooling-protects-oxygen-deprived-infants-1.15525

#

Meilenstein 4: eine der Grundfunktionen des Gedächtnisbildung in den Hirnzellen entschlüsselt

    [*quote*]
    ———————————————————
    Light switches memories on and off

    Researchers use optogenetics to provide the first hard evidence that long-term potentiation at brain synapses is crucial for memory formation

    Optogenetics Optogenetics allows researchers to control the activity of nerve cells using pulses of laser light delivered into the brain with an optical fibre.

    A team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has determined the cellular mechanism of memory formation, putting an end to decades of speculation about the matter.

    Most neuroscientists agree that memory formation involves the strengthening of synapses in the brain, and have assumed that this strengthening occurs by a form of synaptic plasticity called long-term potentiation (LTP), even though there was no hard evidence that this is the case.

    The new research uses state-of-the-art neurotechnology to show not only that that the strengthening of synapses by LTP is required for the formation of fearful memories, but also that weakening of the same synapses by a similar, opposing mechanism can erase the memories.

    LTP was discovered in the 1960s by a Norwegian scientist named Terje Lømo, who was using pairs of electrodes to examine the activity of nerve cells in the rabbit hippocampus. Lømo used one electrode to stimulate cells in one region, and the other to simultaneously measure changes in the activity of connected cells in a neighbouring area.
    ———————————————————
    [*/quote*]

    mehr:
    http://www.theguardian.com/science/neurophilosophy/2014/jun/03/optogenetic-memory-switch




*ESPIONAGE ACT CASE WAS “OVERCHARGED,” DEFENSE SAYS*
Thursday 3 July 2014 @ 4:14 pm

Steven Aftergood kindly allowed me to reproduce his article here.

[*quote*]
————————————————————————
*SECRECY NEWSfrom the FAS Project on Government SecrecyVolume 2014, Issue
No. 44
June 30, 2014
*Secrecy News Blog:
http://blogs.fas.org/secrecy/

*** ESPIONAGE ACT CASE WAS “OVERCHARGED,” DEFENSE SAYS*
*** ARMY DOCTRINE ON GEOSPATIAL ENGINEERING*
*** ODNI DECLASSIFIES DATA ON FREQUENCY OF SURVEILLANCE*

*ESPIONAGE ACT CASE WAS “OVERCHARGED,” DEFENSE SAYS*

In 2012, former Navy linguist James F. Hitselberger was indicted
(http://fas.org/blogs/secrecy/2012/11/collector_charged/)
on two felony counts under the Espionage Act statutes after several classified documents were found in his possession. In 2013, a superseding indictment
(http://fas.org/sgp/jud/hitsel/indict-sup.pdf)
charged him with another four felony counts.

But in the end, Mr. Hitselberger pleaded guilty
(http://www.politico.com/blogs/under-the-radar/2014/04/exnavy-lingust-pleads-guilty-in-secret-documents-case-187436.html)
this year to a single misdemeanor charge of removing classified documents without authorization.

Now both the defense
(http://fas.org/sgp/jud/hitsel/062414-defsent.pdf)
and the prosecution
(http://fas.org/sgp/jud/hitsel/062414-govsent.pdf)
are endorsing Hitselberger’s request that any jail penalty be limited to the time he has already served, including two months in DC jail and eight months of home confinement. The sentencing hearing is scheduled for July 17.

Despite the stark disparity between the multiple felony counts with which Hitselberger was charged, and the single misdemeanor of which he was convicted, the prosecution said that it had no second thoughts about the way the matter was handled.

“It is important to note that the government’s case against Mr. Hitselberger did not collapse,” prosecutors said
(http://fas.org/sgp/jud/hitsel/062414-govsent.pdf)
in a June 27 sentencing memorandum. To the contrary, prosecutors wrote, “in several ways, the government’s case became stronger than what it had been when the charges were first obtained.”

Defense attorneys disputed that assertion and said the government had overreached.

“At a minimum, the evidence demonstrates that the government significantly overcharged the case, and the guilty plea to a misdemeanor not only was the appropriate result, but also demonstrates how the offense should have been charged from the beginning,” the defense wrote in a June 27 reply
(http://fas.org/sgp/jud/hitsel/062714-reply.pdf)

The mountain of Espionage Act charges that yielded a molehill of a misdemeanor in this case recalls a similar progression in the prosecution of former NSA official Thomas Drake, where ten felony counts gave way
(http://fas.org/blogs/secrecy/2011/07/drake_transcript/)
to a technical misdemeanor. This recurring pattern may indicate that overcharging is a standard prosecutorial approach to such cases, or that the judicial process is effectively winnowing out excessive felony charges, or perhaps both.

A June 26 sentencing memorandum submitted by the defense
(http://fas.org/sgp/jud/hitsel/062414-defsent.pdf)
presented its own account of the facts of the case, along with several moving testimonials from Hitselberger’s friends and relatives as to his character.

In another pending Espionage Act case, the Obama Administration must decide if it will pursue a subpoena against New York Times reporter James Risen.
For a current update, see Reporter’s Case Poses Dilemma for Justice Dept.
(http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/28/us/case-of-james-risen-times-reporter-poses-dilemma-for-justice-department.html)
by Jonathan Mahler, New York Times, June 27.

*ARMY DOCTRINE ON GEOSPATIAL ENGINEERING*

Those who are involved (or merely interested) in the field of geospatial intelligence will want to know about a new Army doctrinal publication on the subject.

“Geospatial intelligence is the exploitation and analysis of imagery and geospatial information to describe, assess, and visually depict physical features and geographically referenced activities on the earth. Geospatial intelligence consists of imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial information.”

The new publication provides a comprehensive introduction to the theory and practice of the field. See Geospatial Engineering
(http://fas.org/irp/doddir/army/atp3-34-80.pdf)
,ATP 3-34.80, June 2014 (very large pdf).

*ODNI DECLASSIFIES DATA ON FREQUENCY OF SURVEILLANCE*

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence released
(http://icontherecord.tumblr.com/transparency/odni_transparencyreport_cy2013)

the “2013 Statistical Transparency Report” detailing the frequency of use of various intelligence surveillance authorities and the estimated number of targets affected by the surveillance.

While the reported numbers give some rough sense of the scale of intelligence surveillance — civil liberties groups said the estimated numbers are bound to be misleadingly low — the report provides no basis for evaluating the utility or legitimacy of the surveillance activities.

How many of the collection activities were authorized on the basis of erroneous information? How many actually produced useful intelligence? The report
(http://fas.org/sgp/othergov/intel/stat-2013.pdf)
doesn’t say, and the raw numbers are not a substitute. If they were ten times higher, or ten times lower, we would be none the wiser.

(A supplemental response
(http://fas.org/irp/news/2014/06/odni-062714.pdf)
from ODNI to Senator Wyden was released
(http://www.wyden.senate.gov/news/press-releases/wyden-releases-details-of-backdoor-searches-of-americans-communications)
today.)

See U.S. Phone Searches Expanded in 2013
(http://online.wsj.com/news/article_email/u-s-phone-searches-expanded-in-2013-1403914720-lMyQjAxMTA0MDIwNzEyNDcyWj)
by Siobhan Gorman, *Wall Street Journal*, June 27, and related coverage elsewhere
(WashPost
(http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/us-releases-data-on-sensitive-surveillance-programs-for-first-time/2014/06/27/46bbd47e-fe3a-11e3-8176-f2c941cf35f1_story.html)
,Wired
(http://www.wired.com/2014/06/90000-foreigners-targeted-for-spying/)
,Openthegovernment.org
(http://classifiedsection.openthegovernment.org/2014/06/30/odnis-transparency-report-what-it-tells-us-and-what-it-doesnt/)
,Huffington Post
(http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/27/nsa-transparency-report_n_5538171.html)
).

From a secrecy policy point of view, perhaps the most intriguing feature of the new release is the unconventional timing of its declassification. The report
(http://fas.org/sgp/othergov/intel/stat-2013.pdf)
is dated June 26, 2014 and was classified at the TOP SECRET/NOFORN level. But it says it was declassified by DNI Clapper three days *earlier* on June 23, 2014!

This temporally fluid approach to declassification could have many useful applications.

______________________________________________
Secrecy News is written by Steven Aftergood and published by the Federation
of American Scientists.

The Secrecy News Blog is at:
http://blogs.fas.org/secrecy/

To SUBSCRIBE to Secrecy News, go to:
http://fas.org/sgp/news/secrecy/subscribe.html

OR email your request to saftergood[at]@fas.org

Secrecy News is also archived at:
http://fas.org/sgp/news/secrecy/index.html

Support the FAS Project on Government Secrecy with a donation:
http://fas.org/join/

_______________________
Steven Aftergood
Project on Government Secrecy
Federation of American Scientists
web: http://www.fas.org/sgp/index.html
email: saftergood[at]fas.org
voice: (202)454-4691
twitter: @saftergood

————————————————————————
[*/quote*]

Comments (0) - Posted in DreiNull by  



Leserfinanzierter Journalismus? Das wäre wirklich etwas Neues.
Wednesday 4 June 2014 @ 1:28 am

Leserfinanzierter Journalismus? Das wäre wirklich etwas Neues. Das wäre ja so als ob man Bücher kaufen würde.




Liebe Leser, haltet die Schnauze! … rein prophylaktisch, natürlich…
Thursday 29 May 2014 @ 7:55 am

Liebe Freunde der Zensurschere und anderer Ursulitäten,

weil man nie weiß, ob das Internet morgen noch steht, hier kurz der Artikel [1], bevor er vorausnacheilendem Gehorsamsvollzug zum Opfer fällt:

    http://www.pesterlloyd.net/html/1422vorauseilendezensur.html

    [*quote*]
    ———————————————————-
    (c) Pester Lloyd / 22 – 2014 NACHRICHTEN 29.05.2014

    Vorauseilende Zensur: Medien in Ungarn haften künftig für das Verhalten ihrer Leser

    Das ungarische Verfassungsgericht sah sich diese Woche veranlasst ein Zensuredikt des Obersten Gerichtes zur Verantwortlichkeit für Leserkommentare unter Online-Artikeln zu bestätigen und einen von der Vereinigung der Content Provider eingebrachte Beschwerde dagegen zu verwerfen.

    Protest im ungarischen Parlament anlässlich der Mediengesetze…

    Die Kurie bestand darauf, dass die rechtliche Verantwortung für Kommentare von Lesern, die “die Grenzen der freien Meinungsäußerung” überschreiten, bei den Betreibern der jeweiligen Webseite liegt, unabhängig davon, ob es sich um ein moderiertes oder unmoderiertes Forum handelt.

    Auslösender Fall war jedoch nicht eines der neonazistischen Hetzportale, die tagtäglich gegen alle nur denkbaren Gesetze verstoßen, sondern eine zuvor abgehandelte Verleumdungsklage seitens des Staatssekretär János Lázár, Orbáns rechter Hand, der sich durch Leserkommentare in einer oppositionellen Zeitung beleidigt fühlte und den Prozess gewann. Unmittelbar nach dem Urteil veranlasste er eine entsprechende Gesetzesverschärfung.

    Die Anbietervereinigung, aber auch die Bürgerrechtsgruppe TASZ stehen hingegen auf dem Standpunkt, dass jeder mündige Bürger für seine Taten selbst verantwortlich ist und es völlig ausreichend sei, dass die Provider und Publisher im Falle von strafrechtlichen Übertretungen den Strafverfolgungsbehörden die Verbindungsdaten ausliefern und die inkriminierten Texte entfernen. Alles andere sei gegen Grundrechte gerichtet.

    Nach neuer Rechtsprechung können die Medien nun auch für bereits gelöschte, aber dokumentierte Kommentare belangt werden. Diese Ausdehnung der Verantwortung auf die Medienanbieter würde diese existentiell gefährden, die Folge wäre vorauseileinde Repression gegen die Presse- und Meinungsfreiheit und damit die Einschränkung eines gesellschaftlichen Diskurses, denn nun würden – aus Angst vor kostenintensiven Verfahren oder Strafen – auch Meinungen zensiert, die womöglich gar nicht rechtlich relevant sind.

    Das Verfassungsgericht, das bereits fast zur Hälfte aus von Orbán besetzten Richtern besteht, folgte diesen Befürchtungen nicht, es stellt sich auf den Standpunkt, dass die Ausübung dieser Grundfreiheiten nicht durch die Haftungsausweitung auf die Medien beeinträchtigt wird.
    ———————————————————-
    [*/quote*]

.

Die Harmonisierung des Rechts wird uns noch wundersame Überraschungen bescheren (sic !) – unabhängig davon, ob an dem Artikel etwas dran ist oder man etwas dran läßt.
.

1984 war gestern…

.

[1] Vielen Dank an den PESTER LLOYD (http://www.pesterlloyd.net) für die Erlaubnis zur Wiedergabe des Artikels.




Homeopathy is a Potemkin village of imposturing analphabets
Monday 26 May 2014 @ 1:36 pm

So they did not read Hahnemann even once, those great masters of medicine in general and of the universe in special?

We never would have guessed that, honestly…




Aktivismus und Journalismus: Friedrichs-Regel “offenkundig falsch”
Friday 9 May 2014 @ 3:59 am

“Aktivismus und Journalismus: Friedrichs-Regel “offenkundig falsch””

http://derstandard.at/1399507025370/Aktivismus-und-Journalismus-Friedrichs-Regel-offenkundig-falsch
(Der Standard)

Und was ist jetzt? Ist der Satz falsch, weil er von Friedrichs nicht gesagt wurde? Oder weil er inhaltlich falsch ist?

Darf der Satz nur angegriffen werden, weil man die Quelle nicht finden kann?

Was ist mit denen, die fast 20 Jahre lang mit diesem Satz maltraitiert und indoktriniert wurden? Werden sie endlich den Mund aufmachen dürfen oder ist die Schere im Kopf schon zu zerstörerisch gewesen und der Hirnschaden irreparabel?

Es gibt ein 2. Beispiel: “Positiv denken!” Das kam vor über 50 Jahren nach Europa. Und es wütet immer noch.

Wieviele Jahrzehnte soll sich der Journalismus einer definitiv INHALTLICH falschen Order unterwerfen?
.

Es stellt sich übrigens auch eine ganz andere Frage: Was wäre, wenn Jemand etwas inhaltlich richtiges gesagt hat, und sich hinterher herausstellt, daß er es gar nicht gesagt hat?: Wird die Aussage dann plötzlich ungültig, obwohl sie doch inhaltlich wahr ist?

Warum wird immer wieder Gurus hinterhergehechelt? Warum werden immer wieder Gurus aufgebaut, denen sich Andere zu unterwerfen haben?

Warum wird nicht ENDLICH der *INHALT* in den Mittelpunkt des Journalismus gestellt?
.
Der real praktizierte Journalismus als Suhle von Herdentriebsendorphinikern muß ein-für-allemal ein Ende haben!




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